Best Herbal Viagra Alternatives

herbal viagra

News that Viagra Connect (sildenafil citrate 50mg) is now available from pharmacies without the need for a prescription has rekindled interest in the best herbal Viagra alternative. Almost all cultures have traditional herbal medicines that are used treat male erectile dysfunction (impotence). Many also have a reputation for boosting sex drive in both men and women, which is something that Viagra, Cialis, Levitra and related pharmaceuticals cannot do.

How do herbal Viagra alternatives work?

Viagra and related drugs work by blocking an enzyme (PDE5) which enhances the effects of nitric oxide, a powerful blood vessel dilator. While a few herbal Viagra alternatives work in a similar way, they also have different, additional actions and may, for example:

  • Improve general physical and mental wellbeing when a low sex drive is due to stress or fatigue
  • Increase libido through a direct action on brain chemicals
  • Increase sexual desire through a hormone-like action or by enhancing the effects of natural hormones such as testosterone
  • Raise low mood to overcome the loss of sex drive linked with depression
  • Increase blood flow to the reproductive organs, to stimulate sensations such as tingling or throbbing
  • Increase production of reproductive fluids, which act as a sexual trigger in the male
  • Stimulate erotic dreams or thoughts
  • Reduce sexual inhibitions
  • Stimulate and strengthen blood flow via nitric oxide to enhance erections.

Unfortunately, not all traditional herbal Viagra alternatives, have good quality clinical trials to investigate their effectiveness as these studies are too expensive for small manufacturers to perform. The most effective herbal aphrodisiacs based on clinical evidence and traditional use are:

Herbal remedies that combine a number of herbs may work better, and reduce the risk of side effects as lower doses of each are needed. Some of these herbal medicines are used by both men and women, while others are best reserved for one particular sex.

NB Do not take any supplements during pregnancy or when breast-feeding. Check with your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking any prescribed medical treatments as interactions can and do occur.

Tribulus terrestris for men and women

Tribulus terrestris is an Ayurvedic medicine whose fruits are widely used to treat male genito-urinary symptoms, low sex drive and erectile dysfunction.

Tribulus terrestris contain furostanol saponins with a hormone like action. Some studies suggest that Tribulus terrestris increases blood testosterone levels while have not found this is the case. Emerging evidence suggests that it may partly work through nitric oxide (like Viagra and related drugs) to improve erectile dysfunction, but the mechanism for its aphrodisiac activity is less certain.

A study involving 30 older males with testosterone deficiency syndrome found that taking 250 mg Tribulus terrestris, three times a day for three months produced a statistically significant increase in blood levels of testosterone (total and free) and improvements in erectile dysfunction scores.

A trial involving 180 males with mild to moderate erectile dysfunction tested the effects of Tribulus terrestris (500 mg three times a day, after meals) against placebo. Those taking  Tribulus terrestris, had a significantly  2.7 fold greater improvement in erectile dysfunction scores than those taking placebo. Statistically significant improvements were also found for Intercourse Satisfaction, Orgasmic Function and Sexual Desire. There were no differences in the incidence of side effects and the therapy was well tolerated.

Tribulus terrestris also has protective effects on human sperm motility and viability due to its antioxidant properties


In women, a study involving 60 postmenopausal women with sexual dysfunction found that taking Tribulus terrestris for 90 days produced significant improvements in desire, sexual interest, foreplay, arousal and harmonious interaction with their partner, compared with placebo, as well as improved sensation, vaginal lubrication and comfort during sexual intercourse and the ability to reach orgasm. The researchers concluded that Tribulus terrestris is effective in treating sexual problems among menopausal women.

Tribulus terrestris was also effective as an aphrodisiac in premenopausal women with low sex drive. Sixty women with hypoactive sexual desire disorder took either Tribulus terrestris extract (250 mg, three times a day) or placebo for 4 weeks. Those taking Tribulus  experienced significant improvement in desire, arousal, lubrication, satisfaction and pain compared with placebo.

Another study involving 45 postmenopausal women reported similar effects with Tribulus terrestris at a dose of 750 mg per day compared with placebo. This study suggested an increase in the serum levels of free and bioavailable testosterone levels was the probable mechanism of action.

Who would benefit from Tribulus terrestris: men whose low sex drive is linked with low testosterone levels, those aged over 45 in whom testosterone levels are naturally starting to fall, and men with erectile dysfunction.

Tribulus terrestris dose: 250mg capsules three times a day (standardised to contain 40% furostanol saponins or not less than 112.5mg).

Clinical studies found no significant side effects. However, there is one report of a 36-year-old male developing priapism (an erection that would not go away) after using Tribulus terrestris. While rare, this is a surgical emergency and if your erection is persistent, seek medical advice without delay.

Ginseng for men and women

Panax ginseng – also known as Chinese, Korean, Asian or American ginseng – has been revered as a revitalising and life-enhancing tonic for over 7000 years. The roots and ginseng berries have been used to treat sexual problems.

Ginseng is a true pro-sexual supplement, prized as an aphrodisiac, sexual balancer and fertility enhancer. Its roots contain a variety of substances known as ginsenosides, many of which have a similar structure to human sex hormones such as testosterone and oestrogen, and to adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) which is involved in stress responses. ACTH also stimulates the adrenal glands to increase their output of sex hormones which normally contribute around 5% of circulating oestrogen and testosterone. Preliminary studies suggest that panquilon, an enzyme found in Panax ginseng, is responsible for increasing sex drive.

In men, ginseng appears to increase levels of nitric oxide in the spongy tissue of the penis to increase local blood flow. This action is similar to that of sildenafil (Viagra) and related drugs prescribed to treat erectile dysfunction.

The results from six randomized trials which included 349 men showed that ginseng produces highly significantly (P<0.00001) improvements in erectile dysfunction compared with placebo within 4 to 12 weeks. Approximately 58% of men experienced an improvement in some aspect of sexual function compared with 20% of men who received placebo.

In a recent study, 119 men with erectile dysfunction took either Korean ginseng berry (four tablets, each containing 350mg extract) or inactive placebo for 8 weeks. Significant improvements were reported in both erectile dysfunction and premature ejaculation scores.

Frequency of sexual intercourse, morning erection, firmness of penis and size of tumescence were significantly greater (67%) in those taking the ginseng than those taking placebo (28%).

For women, ginseng is often included in blends with other prosexual ingredients. The closely related American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius) is often recommended for women as it has a sweeter tasting and a more gentle action. The combination of ginseng plus L-arginine, ginkgo, damiana, vitamins and minerals was found to increase female sex drive within 4 weeks, with three out of four women reporting improved satisfaction compared with only one in three (37%) taking inactive placebo. The most noticeable improvements were recorded for sexual desire, reduction of vaginal dryness, frequency of sexual intercourse and orgasm, and for clitoral sensation.

Who would benefit from ginseng: Men and women whose low sex drive is linked with stress, over-work, fatigue, convalescence or hormone imbalances. It is especially helpful for women (and men) who are experiencing mid-life menopause-like symptoms.

Ginseng dose: Start with a low dose and work up from 200mg – 600mg per day to find the level you tolerate best. If you find Korean ginseng too stimulating, switch to American ginseng.

Traditionally, ginseng is taken for two to 6 weeks, followed by a break. Typical regimes are a two weeks on, two weeks off cycle, or a 6 weeks on, 8 weeks off cycle.

Ginseng is not advised if you have high blood pressure or if you have an oestrogen dependent condition (eg pregnancy, cancer of the breast, ovaries, uterus or prostate).

No significant side effects have been reported but some studies have noted hormonal effects such as post-menopausal bleeding and cyclical breast pain in women at high doses.

Maca for men and women

Maca (Lepidium Meyenii) is a root vegetable, related to the potato, which grows in the Peruvian Andes and has been used as a food staple since before the time of the Incas. Maca is a traditional herbal aphrodisiac for men and women. Some researchers believe Maca is superior to Korean ginseng, and it is sometimes referred to as Peruvian ginseng.

Maca tubers contain steroid glycosides with oestrogen-like actions, including stigmasterol, sitosterol, and beta-ecdysone. Dried, powdered Maca is used to increase energy and stamina and is used by some athletes as an alternative to anabolic steroids, without the side effects. Maca is reputed to act as an aphrodisiac and to improve erectile dysfunction.

The results from four clinical trials found that Maca has significant positive effects on sexual function and sexual desire in both men and women compared with placebo.

For men, two published trials showed positive effects on sexual desire, and one showed significant benefits in erectile dysfunction. When 50 males took dry Maca extracts (2400mg per day) or placebo for 12 weeks, those taking Maca experienced a significantly greater increase in desire and performance than those taking placebo.

In women, Maca lifts libido, aids female fertility and helps to relieve menopausal symptoms. Two published trials showed significant effects on sexual desire in postmenopausal women. In one study, women taking 3.5g powdered Maca for 6 weeks showed significant improvements in sexual function compared with placebo, but no changes in horone levels (estradiol, FHS, LH or sex hormone binding globulin) suggesting its effects are independent of oestrogenic or androgenic activity.

Who would benefit from Maca: Any man and woman with low sex drive, and males with erectile difficulties.

Maca dose: 1 gram, two or three times a day

No significant side effects have been reported.

Ginkgo biloba for men and women

The Ginkgo biloba, or Maidenhair tree, has a long history of use in traditional Chinese medicine. While Ginkgo nuts were believed to act as an aphrodisiac, it’s the leaves that have the greatest medicinal effect.

Ginkgo leaves contain powerful antioxidants, including unique chemicals known as ginkgolides and bilobalides which promote dilation of peripheral blood vessels through nitric oxide – a similar action to that of Viagra and related erectile dysfunction drugs. Ginkgo also has effects on serotonin and norepinephrine receptors. The overall effect is improved blood flow to the peripheries, including the brain, and when used to improve memory many men also reported improved erections.

An early trial used Ginkgo biloba extracts to treat low sex drive and other sexual difficulties associated with taking antidepressant drugs. Overall, 91% of women responded to the sexually enhancing effects of Ginkgo biloba compared with 76% of men, for a combined success rate of 84%. Improvements were seen in desire, excitement (erection and lubrication), orgasm, and resolution (afterglow). Two follow-up studies of Ginkgo biloba to treat sexual dysfunction in people taking antidepressant drugs found some ‘spectacular individual responses’ in both groups, but no significant effect overall, however.

In men with erectile dysfunction, Ginkgo biloba extracts showed a beneficial effect within 6 to 8 weeks treatment, and after 6 months half had regained full potency. In a trial involving 50 males who took ginkgo for 9 months, all those who had previously relied on injectable drugs to achieve an erection regained the ability to have erections. Of the 30 men who were not helped by medical drugs, 19 regained their erections with ginkgo.

In women with sexual dysfunction, a single dose of 300 mg Ginkgo biloba was found to have a small but significant effect on physiological sexual arousal, compared to placebo, in 99 women with sexual difficulties. The effects of taking Ginkgo biloba 300 mg for 8 weeks was then compared against plavebo and sex therapy training in 68 women. When combined with sex therapy, Ginkgo biloba significantly increased sexual desire and contentment.

In my own clinical research, conducted with Professor Weynberg,a combination of Ginkgo biloba and Muira puama in 202 healthy women complaining of low libido showed significant improvements in frequency of sexual desire, sexual intercourse, and sexual fantasies, as well as in the ability to reach orgasm, and intensity of orgasm.

Ginkgo extracts are often combined with other prosexual herbs such as Muira puama.

Who would benefit from Ginkgo biloba: men and women whose low sex drive is linked with mental fatigue, poor memory, peripheral vascular disease, cold extremities, chilblains, tinnitus or depression. It is also helpful for male smokers who have erectile difficulties and who would also benefit from the antioxidants found in ginkgo.

Ginkgo dose: 200mg to 300mg a day.

No significant side effects have been reported.

Ashwagandha for men and women

Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) is also known as winter cherry or Indian ginseng, is an herbal medicine whose Hindi name means ‘sweat of a horse’ – those who take it are said to attain the strength and sexual vitality of a stallion.

The dried root of Ashwagandha contains alkaloids and a series of unique, steroidal lactones,   known as withanolides, which have a hormone-like action. In Ayurvedic medicine, Ashwagandha is used as a restorative adaptogen to improve stress, anxiety and stamina and to promote refreshing sleep.

In men, Ashwagandha is used to treat infertility, erectile dysfunction and performance anxiety, while in women it is used to increase a low sexual desire, especially where these are related to physical or emotional stress.

A study involving 50 women found that taking Ashwagandha extract (300mg twice a day for 8 weeks) led to significantly higher improvements in arousal, ‘lubrication’, reaching orgasm and satisfaction, and the number of successful sexual encounters compared with placebo.

Ashwagandha is used as a restorative aphrodisiac to improve sexual performance and desire

Who would benefit from Ashwagandha: Men and women whose low sex drive is associated with anaemia, stress, overwork, difficulty sleeping, exhaustion, hormone imbalances, convalescence or lack of stamina.

Ashwagandha dose: Powdered root: 1g – 2g daily.

Capsules standardised to contain 2 – 5mg withanolides: 150mg – 300mg.

No serious side effects have been reported.

Rhodiola for men and women

Rhodiola rosea is an alpine plant that’s often referred to as mountain ginseng or golden root. Rhodiola root is one of the most effective herbal adaptogens for treating stress and has an energising action to overcome fatigue. Rhodiola also improves a low sex drive linked with stress.

Rhodiola root contains unique substances, such as rosavin, rosin, and rosarin, which have a normalising effect on brain chemicals such as serotonin and dopamine and adrenal gland hormones, especially cortisol and noradrenaline.

Rhodiola was tested in a 12 week trial involving 120 men and women (aged 50 plus) who took Rhodiola rosea extract plus a multivitamin and mineral supplement. After 12 weeks treatment, all showed improvements in exhaustion, with improved sleep quality, concentration and memory plus reduced susceptibility to stress and irritability. Libido also increased, and overall effectiveness was rated as ‘good’ or ‘very good’ by 81% of physicians, and 80% of patients.

In another study, Rhodiola rosea extract produced significant improvements in sexual interest and desire, thinking about sex, enjoyment of sex, ability to become aroused, and frequency of sexual activity after 12 weeks treatment.

Who would benefit from Rhodiola: Men and women whose low sex drive is associated with stress, anxiety, sleep difficulties, lack of energy or fatigue. You are likely to see a benefit within one week. Benefits are usually seen within one week.

Rhodiola dose: 200mg to 1g daily.

No significant side effects have been reported.

Damiana for men and women

Damiana is a small shrub with aromatic leaves whose use as an aphrodisiac can be traced back to the Ancient Maya of Central America. Its reputation is so well established that it is even reflected in the botanical name, Turnera diffusa aphrodisiaca. It is also known as passion leaf.

The dried leaves and stems of Damiana contain alkaloids and unique chemicals, such as damianin, plus betasitosterol which have a hormone action. Damiana’s unusual mode of action relates to the presence of volatile, aromatic oils which boost circulation to the reproductive tract and increase sensitivity of nerve endings to stimulate localised tingling and throbbing sensations. These combined effects help to increase sexual desire and pleasure.

Users say it enhances erections so they are firmer and last longer.

Herbalists have suggested that Damiana could have a testosterone like effect but there is no convincing research to support this. When used as a tea, it produces a mild euphoria and some people use it almost as a recreational relaxant.

A supplement that combined Damiana with ginseng, ginkgo, L-arginine, vitamins and minerals, was tested in 108 women (aged 22 to 73 years) who reported a lack of sexual desire. Compared with placebo, those who took the Damiana supplement for 4 weeks experienced significant improvements in level of sexual desire, satisfaction with overall sex life, frequency of sexual desire and frequency of intercourse. In perimenopausal women there was also an improvement in vaginal dryness compared with placebo.

Another study using the same Damiana containing supplement in 77 women found that, after 4 weeks, 73.5% reported improved satisfaction with sex life, sexual desire, reduced vaginal dryness, frequency of sex and orgasm, and improved sensation, compared with 37.2% of those taking placebo.

Who would benefit from Damiana: Men and women whose loss of sex drive is linked with decreased sensitivity of the genitals, difficulty achieving arousal. Also useful for men who have erectile difficulties.

Damiana dose: Dried herb: 1 – 4g three times a day

Capsules: 200mg – 800 mg daily

Damiana is usually taken on an occasional basis when needed rather than regularly. It is often combined with other pro-sexual herbs such as ginseng, sarsaparilla, or Muira Puama. Damiana’s power as an aphrodisiac is said to be increased when taken together with saw palmetto berries.

No serious side effects have been reported. As it may reduce iron absorption from the gut it should not be used regularly, long-term.

Catuaba for men and women

Catuaba (Erythroxylon vacciniifolium; Trichilia catigua) is known in Brazil as the Tree of Togetherness or the Tree of Love and is one of the most successful aphrodisiac herbs. Traditionally, the bark was used to concoct a tea infusion which was sweetened with honey or Stevia to mask its bitterness, and consumed three to four times a day to increase sex drive.

Catuaba tree bark contains aromatic resins and unique alkaloids called catuabins  It acts as a sexual stimulant and natural aphrodisiac, promoting erotic dreams and increasing sexual energy in both men and women. Erotic dreams usually start within 5 to 21 days of taking Catuaba regularly, followed by increased sexual desire. Catuaba also improves peripheral blood flow which may be another mechanism of action in boosting male sexual performance.

Catuaba is widely used to maintain potency and fertility in older males and to treat erectile dysfunction. It is so popular that there is a saying in Brazil: ‘Until a father reaches 60, the son is his; after that the son is Catuaba’s’.

Although traditionally used to enhance male sex drive, Catuaba is also effective in women. Brazilian couples traditionally steeped Catuaba bark in a bottle of rum and enjoyed a small glass together before bedtime.

Who would benefit from Catuaba: Men and women with loss of desire, especially if due to overwork, stress or boredom, and men suffering from erectile dysfunction, especially in later life.

Catuaba dose: 1gram on waking, and 1gram on going to bed.

No serious side effects have been reported.

Muira puama for men and women

Muira Puama (Ptychopetalum olacoides) is derived from the bark of a Brazilian tree and is widely used by natives of the Amazon to enhance sexual desire and boost erectile function. It is so effective that its local name iss Potency Wood.

Muira puama, or marapuama, contains hormone-like substances such as campestrol and beta-sitosterol. It is believed to stimulate sexual desire both psychologically, through a direct action on brain chemicals such as dopamine, noradrenaline and serotonin, and physically by stimulating nerve endings in the reproductive tract. It may also enhance the production or effects of sex hormones that regulate libido, especially testosterone.

In men, a clinical study of 262 men found 62% claimed it had a dynamic effect on their sex lives. Two out of three taking Muira Puama for low libido reported increased sexual desire, while 50% of those experiencing erectile dysfunction said it was beneficial.

For women: My own published study into the effectiveness of Muira puama on libido and sexual activity involved 202 women with low sex drive. Significant improvements occurred within one month in two out of three women, including an increase in frequency of sexual desire, sexual intercourse and sexual fantasies. Those taking part reported increased satisfaction with their sex life, intensity of sexual desires, arousal level, ability to reach orgasm, and intensity of orgasm. Postmenopausal women responded better than premenopausal women.

Who would benefit from Muira puama: Any male experiencing low libido plus erectile dysfunction, and postmenopausal women with low sex drive.

Muira Puama dose: 500mg up to three times daily for two weeks.

Muira Puama is often combined with other herbs such as Ginseng, Sarsaparilla, Damiana or Catuaba.

Horny Goat Weed for men and women 

Horny goat weed (Epimedium sp) is also known as lusty goat herb, and is a popular aphrodisiac in the East. It has a long tradition of use in China to treat low libido, erectile dysfunction and fatigue, and is often combined with other prosexual herbs such as Damiana or Maca.

Horny Goat Weed contains a unique flavonol glycoside, icariin, which inhibits the same enzyme (PDE5) as sildenafil (Viagra) and related drugs prescribed to treat erectile dysfunction. Even dilute extracts from Horny Goat Weed contain enough icariin to inhibit the PDE5 enzyme by as much as 80%. However, the aphrodisiac effects of Horny Goat Weed are believed to result from its lant hormones known as prenyl-flavones. Horny Goat Weed also contains a series of unique molecules (epimedins, epimedosides and icariososides) which were only recently discovered and which may further explain its actions.

Veterinary studies suggest that Horny Goat Weed can boost sperm counts and stimulate erections in aged, diabetic and even castrated animals, so it is surprising that no human trials have been carried out in older males with erectile dysfunction. If you’ve found it helpful, please share your experiences anonymously below via the comments.

For women, Horny Goat Weed extracts have beneficial hormonal effects which would be of benefit to menopausal women.

Who would benefit from Horny Goat Weed: Any man or woman with low sex drive, especially those aged 40 and over.

Horny Goat Weed Dose: 500mg to 1g daily.

Horny goat weed is found in many supplements marketed for sexual health, and is often combined with other herbs and l-arginine.

Horny goat weed is not available on Amazon.co.uk but you can buy it from Holland & Barrett or order supplements on Amazon.com to import for personal use.

Pfaffia for women

Pfaffia (Pfaffia paniculata) is obtained from a Brazilian vine that has been used as a female aphrodisiac for at least 300 years. It is also known as Suma or Brazilian ginseng.

The dried, golden root of Pfaffia is a rich source of plant hormones (up to 11% by weight) such as stigma

sterol and sitosterol, plus unique pfaffocides with an oestrogen-like action.

Although Pfaffia is unrelated to Chinese ginseng, it has similar properties and is used as a tonic during times of stress, over-work, convalescence and fatigue. It is used to boost physical, mental and sexual energy levels as well as producing a general sense of well-being.

In women, the oestrogenic nature of Pfaffia is used to treat a variety of gynaecological problems linked with hormonal imbalances such as pre-menstrual syndrome and menopausal symptoms as a natural hormone replacement therapy. I’ve met older women in Brazil with the most lovely, dewy, youthful skin that they attribute to regular use of Pfaffia. unfortunately ther is little research into its prosexual effects.

In Brazil, Pfaffia is used as a remedy for male erectile dysfunction, but because of its high oestrogen levels, it is best reserved for use in women.

Who would benefit from Pfaffia: Women whose low sex drive is linked with hormone imbalances, diabetes, overwork, stress or fatigue. It is especially useful for women with premenstrual syndrome or menopausal symptoms.

Pfaffia dose: 1g daily. Beneficial aphrodisiac effects are usually noticed within 3 to 5 days.

If you have diabetes monitor your glucose levels closely as Pfaffia is used in Brazil to treat diabetes, and may boost insulin production, normalise blood sugar levels and reduce insulin requirements. NB If on medication for any condition always seek advice from your doctor before using any herbal medicine.

Although plant oestrogens may protect against oestrogen sensitive conditions, if you have a history of breast or other hormone-related cancers, only take oestrogenic herbs under specialist supervision.

Sarsaparilla for men  

Mexican sarsaparilla is a tropical vine whose dried roots are widely used as a male herbal aphrodisiac since ancient times. It was brought to Europe by Spanish traders in the 14th Century, and is a key flavouring in Root Beer.

Sarsaparilla contains hormone-like steroids (eg sarsapogenin, smilagenin, sitosterol and stigmasterol) that have been used commercially to synthesise sex hormones, particularly testosterone. However, the reactions needed to convert these plant steroids into testosterone do not occur in the body and no studies have shown sarsaparilla to have an anabolic effect that increases muscle mass in humans. Sarsaparilla is therefore not as virilising as you might expect and is even used to treat acne which is a condition usually associated with increased  activity of male hormones.

Many men take sarsaparilla to  improve virility, vitality and energy levels. It is also widely used to boost a low male sex drive and to help overcome erectile problems and infertility. However, there is little research into its effects.

In women, Sarsaparilla is used in lower doses to boost a low female sex drive and to improve menopausal symptoms, but it is best avoided by females due to a possible tendency to increase unwanted hair growth.

Who would benefit from Sarsaparillo: Men with low energy levels.

Sarsaparilla dose: 250mg – 500mg once or twice a day.

No serious long-term effects have been reported. The best Sarsaparilla is said to produce a slightly nauseating, acrid taste in the mouth, and even to cause a burning sensation.

NB Some dried roots labelled Mexican sarsaparilla (Smilax officinalis) actually contain so-called Indian sarsaparilla from a different plant (Hemidesmus indicus) with different uses. Hemidesmus is dark brown and smells of vanilla, while dried Smilax roots have a light colour (often orange tinged) and are odourless.

Schisandra for men and women

Schisandra, also known as magnolia vine, is a popular Chinese tonic herb that’s also known as wu wei zi, or five-flavoured fruit, as unusually it tastes salty, sweet, bitter, sour and pungent all at the same time.

Schisandra berries contain plant hormones such as schizandrin, beta-sitosterol and stigmasterol as well as volatile oils that are believed to contribute to its effects. One way in which it works is to increase oxygen uptake in cells to improve their function. This may also explain why it appears to improve mental clarity, memory, depression and fatigue.

Schisandra is considered a true prosexual herb and was used in Taoist practitice to enhance  sexual energy and stamina in both men and women. In females, it reputedly increases lubrication and desire, although there is little research into its effects.

In 41 women with menopausal symptoms, Schizandra was found to be safe and effective for reducing hot flushes, sweating, and heart palpitations.

Who would benefit from Schizandra: men and women whose low sex drive is linked with nervous exhaustion, general fatigue, insomnia, anxiety and stress.

Schizandra dose: 250mg – 500mg once to three times daily.

Schizandra is traditionally taken for 100 days to boost sexual energy and vitality.

So there is plenty to choice when it comes to selecting an herbal viagra alternative. Have you tried any herbal aphrodisiacs or treatments for erectile dysfunction? If so, which did you find effective? Please share your experience via the comments below.

Image credits:  pixabay; Wikimedia; Shutterstock

 

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